Cell Isolation


Cell Isolation

Isolation is one of the hardest trials life can throw at someone. God identifies this in Genesis 2:18 as it states, “And the Lord God said, It is not good that the man should be alone; I will make him an help meet for him.” There is an innate need for both companionship and just simple social interaction. Taking into account personality types as well, the introvert may not require the level of social interaction as the extrovert, but the need is still there. There are times in life, however, when it seems like we are isolated from the entire world around us. When everything appears to be happening in rapid succession on the other side of a glass window from our lives. We learn that these moments tend to teach us a lot about ourselves. When it comes to cell isolation, a doctor must isolate the antigen from cells in order to create a vaccine. There is an element of isolation that leads itself to the creation of something better.

Without diving into medical science that far exceeds my understanding, I believe it is crucial to understand some element of the creation of a vaccine in order to fully grasp the essence of the point of this article. While there are many types of vaccines and various methods of implementing the vaccine, I want to focus primary on the general process of immunization. When biologists aim to create a vaccine for a particular virus, they will first focus on the virus itself. They will first observe the virus on the cellular level, and then endeavor to isolate cells and antigens from those cells. This process of isolation allows the doctor to use the individual cell as the vaccine. The doctor cannot create a suitable vaccine without first implementing the process of isolation.

Perhaps nobody in the Bible knew the price of isolation more than the apostle Paul. From a different perspective, and a fun play on words, he was very well educated in the idea of cell isolation. He spent numerous years locked away in Roman prisons. Arguably the greatest moments of Paul’s ministry took place in a damp, dark cell lit only by the scant light of a candle. God isolated Paul from everyone else in order to develop in him something that would outlast his physical body and still be around for us today. His time of cell isolation led Paul to write epistles that we are still reading today, some 1900 years later. The apostle Paul’s life and ministry teaches us that sometimes God must isolate us in order to use us.

God has a way of shaping life so that we go through seasons where we feel isolated from the world around us. It is these times of isolation that we can get low and fall into a pit of despair; however, we must look to God to see his hand in the matter. Often times, if God has confined you, he aims to define you. It can be those moments of isolation that molds and shapes you to fit the destiny he has in mind for you to fulfill. Like the biologist, we must use the time of isolation to build upon it and create something out of it. It is true that isolation is hard, and the process is uncomfortable, but the end result is well worth the price paid. Next time you find yourself seemingly isolated and distance from those around you, take a step back and ask yourself what is God trying to do in this? I believe the answer will be extraordinary.